Energy & Emissions

Energy & emissions

AGRANA’s processing of agricultural raw materials is energy-intensive, especially in the Starch and Sugar segments. It is subject to the EU Emissions Trading Scheme and, through the greenhouse gas emissions generated, has negative impacts on people and the environment. AGRANA is committed to operating responsibly and strives to minimise harmful emissions to the extent possible or reduce them to a lower and lower level.

Energy consumption (Scope 1+2) of the AGRANA Group
 
Energy mix of the AGRANA Group
2019|20
 
Emissions (Scope 1+2) of the AGRANA Group
 

Energy Consumption in & Emissions from Processing Operations at AGRANA plants

Energy Consumption in Processing Operations

Energy Consumption in Processing Operations

(in the GRI-Boundaries)

 

Emissions from Processing

Emissions from Processing

(in the GRI-Boundaries)

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Decarbonisation strategy 2040

As the existing AGRANA energy targets for the period from 2014|15 to 2020|21 did not yet address the targets of the Paris climate accord, in 2019|20, AGRANA worked intensively to develop a decarbonization strategy. AGRANA is committed to the goal of CO2-neutral production by 2040.

This challenging target can only be achieved by a politically and societally supported mix of measures in several steps. While there is only limited potential for further improvement in energy efficiency using existing technologies, AGRANA’s possible ways of transitioning to renewable energy sources include purchasing electricity from renewable sources and, additionally, generating its own energy from biomass.

Thus far, AGRANA has been striving for the complete cascading use of agricultural raw materials in the manufacture of core products (mainly food ingredients) and by-products (animal feed and fertiliser), true to its principle of full utilisation and in line with the concept of a bio-economy. The primary focus in this, besides the products’ commercial marketability, is their usability for the human food chain. On the by-products side, AGRANA’s high-quality GMO-free protein animal feeds, which help to reduce the European protein feed gap that is covered by imports of predominantly genetically modified soya feed from overseas, are of particular importance.

In principle, in the future, low-protein raw material residues could be used to generate energy and replace fossil energy sources, as in AGRANA’s Hungarian sugar factory in Kaposvar, where beet pulp and other residues have already been used for biogas production for several years. However, as the utilisation for energy recovery cuts into feedstuff revenue, appropriate business conditions are required for it to be implemented economically. By the end of the 2020|21 financial year, the last year of its current target period, AGRANA will develop a concrete, staged plan for decarbonisation by 2040 which, in addition to a swift total phase-out of coal and coke use, will include projects for energy recovery from biomass.